lien botha
a photographer's geography - lien botha
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            2011
            Yonder

            2009
            Parrot Jungle

            2008
            Moundou
            White stick for the Arctic
            2006
            Beth's Maze
            Not the Missionary
            Amendment
            & Company

            2005
            Pujols
            Springbok Poems
            After Thunberg
            Cutting Water

            2004
            Suzy's Lovers
            Library hours

            2003
            Safari
            Brothers' Keeper
            Vier susters

            2002
            Radio Maria
            Photo brooch

            2001
            Book of gloves

            2000
            Ten degrees of separation

            1999
            Voëlhuis
            Ten trees growing nowhere

            1990 - 1998
            Archived Exhibitions

Boxing Days (1997)

Condition on admissionTransferredNothing too small for the poachersBarcode 6

Boxing Days comprises twenty six works. In this series of ten floor pieces and sixteen related wall pieces, Lien Botha has created a body of imagery which allowed her to synthesise her sensory creative concerns, personal experiences, interest in language, and speculations on historical processes and societal behaviour. The artworks, developed around the theme 'Boxing Days', explore action and passivity within structures of containment. They investigate levels of injury and violation, and the ways in which damage is processed and dealt with socially. The works raise troubling questions about behavioural norms and levels of tolerance for violence, deviance and apparent normality. These images are raised obliquely through fragments of information, signs, references and traces of activity, while relationships are established by physical connections and processes of joining, binding, sewing and pinning materials and images.

  See review by Jeff Chandler        See review by Daya Coetzee